The Human Saga of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011

Jan 31, 2011 by

Editor’s Note: We do not normally repost articles from Mr. Claxton’s personal website, but this one has such far reaching business, political, public relations and economic impacts, we thought it was appropriate.

A very real, inspiring story of revolution and the human spirit is taking place daily in our world right now that can have long-term and incredible consequences and effects however it unravels.

Egyptian citizens are in their seventh day now of passionate, angry protests over the actions of their government.  Many have been killed in the protests.  Hundreds have been wounded by gunfire, fighting, etc.   President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt reorganized his government on Monday in the wake of all the upheaval.  That’s not likely to quell the spirits of the people who have lived under his dictatorish hands for 30 years.  They want him gone.  In the works is a March of Millions.  You think they aren’t focused?

WAKE UP AMERICA

But the real story, if you’re listening here, is what happens when people have had enough of the government they’re living under and take it unto themselves to do something about it.

Indeed, 224 years ago yesterday, Jan. 30, 1787, Thomas Jefferson penned, “I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. Unsuccessful rebellions, indeed, generally establish the encroachments on the rights of the people which have produced them. An observation of this truth should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of rebellions as not to discourage them too much. It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government.”

Given the way of American life and politics today, it’s hard to believe that 200-plus years ago, the same dynamics were playing out in America.   But in those days, obviously, there wasn’t 24/7 satellite news.  There wasn’t the Internet.  There wasn’t Twitter.  It’s unlikely that news of an event like this in Egypt would have even reached the shores of America at this point.

So in the midst of all the hype about Super Bowl XLV this coming Sunday, or the latest winter storm that’s beginning to trek across the country, it’s time to watch this fascinating, real life drama unfold.  Will democracy win out?  Will the will of a people be brought about?  Will Mubarik hang on to power?  Or will this all come crashing down in a way that leads to another Iranian type government, hostile toward the US?  Come Sunday afternoon, will it really matter which team won the Super Bowl this year in comparison to what took place in Egypt at the same time?  Seriously?

The Donald

All this is going on.  Donald Trump over on Newsmax said the turmoil in Egypt and other Middle East countries could raise the price of a barrel of oil as high as $200, but also could lead to the end of OPEC, which could lead to the dramatic lowering of the cost of oil.   Either way, Trump called the situation in the Middle East a “Tinderbox.”

“If you look at oil right now, it’s soon going to be $100 a barrel. Far too high. It’s set by OPEC. I think OPEC would explode with the Middle East and that wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world,” Newsmax.com reported.

The American Revolution

If only there had been cable news and Internet in 1776.   We’ve read some of the accounts, read poems like Paul Revere’s Ride, which largely didn’t happen the way it’s purported in the poem.  But that won’t happen in Egypt.  Yes, the government there proved it can shut down the Internet–an equally disturbing revelation–but they’re not able to stop the photo images that are being flashed around the world.  There’s an incredible human story being told.  Are you listening?  Are you watching?  Or are you more worried about what party you’re going to between Dallas and Fort Worth in the next six days?

And what of our own American government’s leadership.  Instead of taking a stand, we’re sitting on the fence waiting to see which way the political wind winds up blowing.  Such is our form of leadership today.  Sad.

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