Books for iPad–Apple’s Push Into Education With Study Cards

Nov 15, 2012 by

Books for iPad–Apple’s Push Into Education With Study Cards

If you’re still walking around thinking that the iPad mini is something to go after the Kindle or Nook, maybe this will finally cure you of that misconception.  With the Study Card feature that now works in iBooks 2 and iBooks 3 for iPad and iPad mini, this clearly, maybe more so than anything else, marks the way for Apple’s big push into the education arena.

Study Cards for Books for iPad clearly mark Apple’s keen interest in the educational arena for iPad and iPad mini.

Now, within books for iPad made with iBooks Author, there is the inclusion of what Apple is calling “Study Cards.” This is probably one of the most un-marketed features of these books for iPad, but it is truly a helpful aspect.

Within each book for iPad, there now is the  “My Notes” section of the book, which includes a chapter-by-chapter listing of all notes taken within the book by a reader. That may not seem like a big deal, as surely, when you make a note in a book, you’d presume it’d go somewhere.  But it’s what happens to them that’s cool.  I should also point out that “My Notes” can be formatted within a book’s text in traditional highlighter colors.

Study Cards

As a book is being built with iBooks Author, the publisher/author has the ability to create an extensive glossary of key terms or words used throughout the work.  Those all populate in the glossary section, but it’s when the book is done, that they reappear in the “Study Cards” that can be generated from the notes made by the reader as well as through glossary terms within each chapter. Glossary terms also may include options for illustrations and index links to every use of the word in the text throughout the book.

Let me explain in simpler terms. If you’re reading a book for class, you come along a section you would have highlighted with a Sharpie in a traditional offline book, you can still highlight it in the same way.  Just rub your finger across the text in question, a dialogue box pops up and you can choose the color you want the text highlighted in.  But on that same menu bar is an option for making a note. When clicked, the on-screen keyboard pops up and the opportunity exists for the reader to add a commentary like, “I NEED TO REMEMBER THIS! THIS WILL BE ON THE TEST!”

When the reader is ready to review, they can follow to the My Notes section of the book and find all the notes and highlights they kept throughout their reading.  But they can also turn those notes into study cards that are going to feature their notes, as well as glossary terms so that as they are studying, they can be quizzing themselves about the definition of terms within each chapter.

And that, friends, is powerful when it comes to self-paced learning, and in Apple’s foray into the education arena with books for iPad and iPad mini.

 

 

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