Books for iPad–The Great Gold Landslide of 2012 And Beyond

Nov 9, 2012 by

Books for iPad–The Great Gold Landslide of 2012

Earlier this year I was having a breakfast meeting–one that lasted for 4.5 hours–with our colleague, George Saltsman from Abilene Christian University’s spin-off, Connected Consulting, (and there’s a story I need to share about George,) but this point I must make first.

We’d been talking about the rise in books for iPad and the adoption rate ACU is seeing as they work with public schools and colleges around the world, and I mean that, around the planet, and I said to George, “We’re in the middle of a Gold Rush.”  He looked at me and said words I never will forget.  “No,” he said. “This is a Gold LANDSLIDE.”

What Apple Isn't Saying About Books For iPad

What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad

A word about George before I go on.  It was George who fellow Claxton Creative developer and long-time friend, Ron Rose, and I met with back in January to talk about the books we wanted to make of the Wonders of the World for our sister-site project, The Wonders Expedition. We were on to making books for iPad, but didn’t realize Apple was releasing iBooks Author in a matter of days.  George knew, but didn’t tell us then. He just said be ready for a major announcement.

And then came the release of iBooks Author. George then talked about the work that’s been going on at ACU for a very long time. All incoming freshmen at the school here in Texas get an iPad. The iPad knows where the student is on campus by pinging and because it knows, for instance, it’s in Dr. Saltsman’s class, the student who has it gets all of the professor’s notes, lectures, quizzes–everything, from the iPad cos it KNOWS where it is.  For the next class, say the student heads to “Dr” Claxton’s class, iPad knows where it is, same deal.

I’ll let you think about that for a moment.

2012: Science & Prophecy of the Ancient Maya

So as 2012 has progressed, we’ve worked with Dr. Mark Van Stone of Southwestern College in San Diego to develop his one and only book for iPad on the ancient Maya made with iBooks Author. It’s an amazing product.

Ask yourself this question.

When was the last time you read a book with two hours worth of video, and four 3D animations of ancient Maya and Aztec artifacts that are almost 1,200 years old?

Readers around the world now are doing that with our book for iPad.

There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse

My company’s associates have been on an amazing learning curve this year.  We’re just now finishing Ken Plume and John Robinson’s There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse.  The print version has been featured in WIRED.  Wait until they see what we’ve done with it for iPad. There are more than 370 videos in the Zombie book.  Read that again.  There are more than 370 videos in their book.

From our offices in Dallas, we have produced some amazing work this year.  But this really is just the beginning.

What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad

Included on ClaxtonCreative.com over the next nine business days are going to be a series of videos that talk about “What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad.”  You can download a free copy for your iPad here.  If you don’t have an iPad and want to see how it looks on an iPad, minus the videos, which we will post here day by day, you can download a free copy of the .PDF version here.

This book isn’t meant to be critical of Apple.

Explained in our book is a basic important principle about Apple–they’re a hardware company. They don’t promote the software products they make. And they’re not doing that with iBooks Author. As a publisher, that frustrates the hell out of me. But think about this. Apple makes Aperture for photography. They make Pages as a word processing client.  They make Final Cut Pro and Express for movie editing.

When have you ever seen a TV commercial about any of those things?

Confusion Still Exists About Books For iPad.

We wrote, “What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad” for this reason.  As we’ve tried to market our 2012 book we’ve run into a wall of confusion. Apple has sold more than 100 million iPads, but at this writing, I’m not sure how many iPad owners even realize how cool iBooks 3 is.

I know what it’s like trying to explain one of our books to the man on the street. You tell them you’ve made a book for the iPad and they think you make words and stuff that appear just like on the Kindle or Nook.

We’ve called TV stations all over Dallas trying to just come by and show them that right here in their own backyard, “books” that are revolutionizing the way kids of all ages all around the world are being made, and there’s nothing.  One photographer suggested if we stood on a corner and assaulted a puppy with an iPad and then added that into a book, we might break thru the TV news ceiling at this point.  And of course, there’s also been the 2012 elections that have sucked up all manner of media attention.

Books Made With iBooks Author

But we feel, even for more than just our own business survival, that it’s important to help tell the story about a book that’s made with iBooks Author that appear on the iPad.

Apple received input from educators and publishers from around the world because Steve Jobs saw books for iPad as a way to make revolutionary changes to the way humans learn.  This was one of his major projects up till the very end of his life.

In January 2012, Apple released iBooks Author software to make what the company calls, “Multi-touch books for iPad.”  Books for the iPad and iPad mini include 3D animations, videos, multi-touch interactive images, puzzles, study guide notecards and now, with the release of the iBooks 3 app—social media.

Because of this development and the rise in published materials for these units now making their way into schools, we are on the verge of a major shift in the development of books and how they are used in the field of education.

Sadly, Apple just isn’t going to overtly promote the revolutionary developmental change in what we have come to know as “books.” They are waging a revolution in education and doing it quietly, but massively through the adoption and placement of technology in the classroom that is unparalleled and replacing the use of PCs and even Macs.

With the iPad mini, Apple is getting into more and more public school districts in America and around the world, which is going to have a profound impact on the way humans learn. More about that later in the series.

 

 

 

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