My Reading List Last Week

Jun 4, 2018 by

My Reading List Last Week

Last week my reading list included Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, his first novel, The Torrents of Spring, one of Hadley Richardson Hemingway’s favorites by Henry James, The Figure in the Carpet, and the incomplete novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Last Tycoon.

At present I’m reading Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises.

A Farewell to Arms is a lovely book, a simple love story about a wounded soldier. An American in Italy during World War I who fell in love with an British nurse. He met her before getting wounded, and then once wounded, their affair really takes off. The book is semi autobiographical. Hemingway really did get hurt and really did fall for a nurse and once he got back to the states she wrote him and broke it off. Hem intended to marry the woman who was several years older than him. The story is very well composed and a must read for any Hemingway fan. Plus it is marked as great American literature.

A Farewell To Arms

Hemingway’s A Farewell To Arms is still a wonderful read in 2018.

The Torrents of Spring took an afternoon to read. This is a book Hemingway wrote in a few week’s time and is a satirical attack on Sherwood Anderson’s Dark Laughter. I will tell you, it is much easier to read than Dark Laughter. And that is in part the point. Anderson uses a lot of lofty language that is often hard to follow. I’m about 70 pages into Dark Laughter and have wandered down the Mississippi River with its main character and I honestly don’t know where we are going. The Torrents of Spring made fun of the Anderson book, though I am certain I missed half of the attack.

Henry James’ The Figure in the Carpet is an interesting read. A critic has written a review of a famous author’s book and is presented to the author who says he really doesn’t read reviews. But he reads this one, and goes on to tell the critic that he has a theme that runs through all of his works but it is clear that the critic has missed it. The critic begs for the author to part with this secret and he tells him to look further. This sets the critic on a mad chase to figure out what it could be. He has two friends who join him in this quest and finally, one of the two says he has figured it out. But before he can reveal it to the critic, he is killed in a car wreck. But he is said to have told it to the other, but she says she will not part with the secret. She marries another man, and then dies later. The critic befriends the man and approaches him about the secret well after the woman has died, and the widower takes offense when he learns that his wife never shared with him this secret. And does the critic ever figure it out?

The Last Tycoon is a novel that Fitzgerald wrote in his late 30s early 40s. He died at 41 of a heart attack. He never finished the book. But just reading what is complete is a wonderful reminder of how wonderful a writer Fitzgerald really was when he was writing and not under the spell and distractions of Zelda. Maybe she will haunt me for saying such, but it becomes more and more clear the more I study about Fitz that the world lost out on many a grand novel by the distraction she brought into his life–by keeping him from writing–once they were married, once he had money and they were consumed by fame, fortune and flappers. I enjoyed the book and wish it had a real ending. But it is also a good read.

 

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The Paris Wife

May 11, 2018 by

The Paris Wife

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain is a fictional account of the marriage between Hadley Richardson and Ernest Hemingway as told through by Hadley.

Most accounts, A Moveable Feast, and Hemingway In Love, are told by Ernest or A.E. Hotchner. I don’t know how much of The Paris Wife is fact or fiction. I have yet to read the biography Paris Without End, The True Story of Hemingway’s First Wife by Gioia Dilberto, but it seems plausible.

The Paris Wife

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain is about the marriage between Hadley and Ernest Hemingway.

McLain’s book tracks right, I mean the events within line up against those mentioned in other works about the Hemingways, so by now, I’m beginning to feel like I know them fairly well. This book is a splash of color, certainly, one that I did enjoy reading. I wish there’d been a note or two at the end that spoke about her assumptions.

The book reads matter of fact. McLain handles her assumption of the mind of Hadley Richardson with great poise and authority. One feels like he/she is in the head of Hadley the entire read and that is quite an accomplishment. When the noose of Pauline begins to tighten and Hadley is unaware it is happening, the story reads innocently. Only from having read other accounts did I know what was going on. McLain handled this perspective so well.

She also handled the revelation, the realization, when Hadley figures out that Pauline and Ernest are having the affair, well. I do not know if there are diary accounts or letters that explain this, again, I’m looking forward to Dilberto’s book—maybe I should have read that one before McLain’s—to better understand how McLain chose to write these scenes. I know how Ernest described the trip to château country in France, what I don’t know enough about is how Hadley truly reacted to Pauline, her sister and Hadley all riding off together and Hadley coming to the realization that Pauline and Ernest were having an affair while they off on the trip.

For anyone studying Hemingway, as I continue to do, this is a must read. Even though it is a fictional account of their lives, it helps to see another side of the story of their lives. I enjoyed this book and recommend it, even if you’re not studying Hemingway. It’s a good story and you’ll learn something. The accounts of F. Scott Fitzgerald and wife Zelda are funny, too.

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Hemingway in Love—His Own Story

May 3, 2018 by

Hemingway in Love—His Own Story

Hemingway in Love—His Own Story is a memoir written by A.E. Hotchner, a friend of the late Ernest Hemingway. Hotchner used letters and tape recordings of Hem to write the book, often using straight transcripts of Papa to fill the pages direct about topics, particularly of his marriage to his first wife Hadley, and second wife Pauline.

Hemingway In Love

Hemingway In Love–His Own Story by A.E. Hotchner is a memoir about Ernest Hemingway and a very poignant book. A must read for any student of Papa.

The book gets into Hem’s paranoia about the FBI tapping his phones and what led to him receiving shock treatments, descriptions of how painful they were, not to mention how unsuccessful they were in treating his ailment—and then at the end reveal that Freedom of Information Act disclosures who how J. Edgar Hoover really was surveilling Hemingway after all.

But if one has any romantic feelings about how mystical and wonderful Hemingway’s life might have been, this book will remove some of that.

The parts about his being torn between his love for Hadley and Pauline are simply tragic.

After he lost both women, as predicted by F. Scott Fitzgerald, who told him to dump Pauline before he lost Hadley, his wife, Hemingway is truly torn with regret for the rest of his life. And it shows in this book. In fact, from Hotchner’s account, Hemingway spent the rest of his life looking to fill the hole in his soul left by the absence of Hadley.

This is a touching and rich book that is a must read for anyone who finds themselves studying Hemingway. He remarks and fills in the blanks about what he was thinking when he wrote several of his short stories and The Sun Also Risesand For Whom The Bell Tolls.

There are special ways that Hemingway talked in his day to day expressions we don’t hear anymore that come to life in this book. Ones I underlined and found colorful and clear.

“No matter what they tell you about reliving the past, it’s not a bridge, and you can’t go over it.”

“Poverty’s a disease that’s cured by the medicine of money.”

“They have remained in the museum of my mind.”

Like I said, this is a must-read book for anyone studying the nature and psychology of one of the most famous writers of the last 100 years. Reading his work is one thing. Hearing him talk about it is quite another. I’ll read this book a couple more times to see what I missed the first time. You should, too.

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