Writing A Novel – Mistakes I’ve Made

May 1, 2014 by

Writing A Novel – Mistakes I’ve Made

Many successful authors will tell you that writing about characters they have created is in part, writing about themselves.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been doing daily exercises of compiling a stack of 3 x 5 notecards full of lists of various self-study questions and topics.

Today is no exception.  And again, whether you’re writing a novel or not, this can be most helpful an exercise.

EXERCISE:

Take out a 3 x 5 notecard, write “WMHIM” and number it, and date it, and then below, start a list of the mistakes you feel you have made in life. When you fill up a card, take out another one, label it and keep going.  Remember, there are no right or wrong answers. And like I’ve repeatedly said, this can be helpful to one whether they’re writing a novel or just trying to get a better handle on the person inside.

What Mistakes Have I Made? 

Writing

Writing (Photo credit: jjpacres)

Enhanced by Zemanta
read more

Congratulations Apple on iTunes U 1 billion downloads

Feb 28, 2013 by

Congratulations Apple on iTunes U 1 billion downloads!iTunesU

At Claxton Creative, we’ve been working to generate content for iTunes U for our clients and studying ways to enhance this ever-expanding form of e-Learning.

Classes on iTunes U are free. That drives some learned professors mad as they don’t understand the revenue model shift. Usually, people pay the school for a seat in a class and class numbers are limited and then there is the sale of recommended books and all.

With iTunes U, that model is changing and let’s just be fair to say there are some in academia who have resisted the shift to this revenue model. That’s probably putting it mildly.

How does a professor make money doing an iTunes U course?  They have an interactive book, preferably one we’ve helped them make for iPad and they use it as the resource for the class. To take the class, a student needs the book for iPad, which can be bought seamlessly through the Apple iBookstore. The more people who take the class, the more who need the book for iPad. Simple formula.  No standing in long lines to register for a class. No meeting with your counselor.  Easy.

It’s also this form of delivery that’s changing the overall method of teaching, and we’ve talked about that before much here on ClaxtonCreative.com. For teachers who do not yet understand, the traditional stand and deliver model of teaching is fast becoming a thing of the past. Self-paced learning, user-centered-learning, are new terms that are catching on in use and meaning.

At Claxton Creative, we are a part of this move to change the educational system for the better and for the future. This is the learning of tomorrow already happening today.

Are you a professor with a tome you need converted to a book for iPad, complete with video, interactive maps, charts and graphs? What if you could have your students using your book and not being able to advance to the next chapter sequence until they have demonstrated mastery?  Yeah, that’s what we can help you make a reality.  And who benefits from that? Your students, and ultimately, your wallet.

Enhanced by Zemanta
read more

‘What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad’

Nov 8, 2012 by

Editor’s Note: This is the news release which begins the first in a series of 10 daily posts about the innovative aspects of books for iPad made with iBooks Author. The series is not critical of Apple, but done to help spread the word of the fascinating education tools that rapidly are going into use around the world and changing the way we learn. You can download our FREE book here. (It is 847 MBs so it is going to take awhile depending on your WiFi speed.)

Download the PDF here.

FREE BOOK FOR iPAD DESIGNED TO EDUCATE PUBLIC ABOUT NEW TECHNOLOGY DESIGNED TO REVOLUTIONIZE HOW HUMANS LEARN

‘What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad’® Features Digital Learning Tools Being Produced In Dallas

DALLAS—Schoolchildren, teachers, maintenance workers and parents themselves increasingly are learning from the type of multi-touch interactive books for iPad and iPad mini that are being produced by a Dallas publisher, and in some areas are exploring ways to generate content where learners must demonstrate topic mastery before advancing to the next.

What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad Cover

Claxton Creative, LLC, the leading publisher in Dallas of the new “books” Steve Jobs was developing before his death last year, Thursday released What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad as a way to educate the public about the emerging technology that was designed to revolutionize the teaching and learning processes.

“Up to the end, Steve Jobs was working on this new form of a ‘book’ that now is revolutionizing the educational process around the world,” said Publisher and Author, Donald Claxton, who also served as the communications director for Dallas schools from 2001-2006. “The iPad mini is being marketed to increase the rate of adoption of iOS tablets in schools. Yet we are finding many parents still are unaware of how the learning process is changing for their kids and they are going to be amazed when the find out.”

In August, this North Texas company, along with Dr. Mark Van Stone of Southwestern College in San Diego, released 2012: Science and Prophecy of the Ancient Maya, which now is available on the iBookstore and being prepared for an upcoming course on iTunes U to be taken worldwide by students of all ages.

“When was the last time you read a book that included two hours of video from 15 Maya scholars and had 3D animations of Maya artifacts that are 1,200 years old? We made this new ‘book’ in Dallas and it’s now on sale in 50 countries, including the entire South American continent. That’s never been possible before 2012 and something not even the ancient Maya could have predicted. But like much of what has been lost about the ancient Maya, many are not yet aware of what can be done on these books for iPad.”

Claxton said his company is negotiating with industry leaders about production of new materials as well as talking to major universities and school districts about how to escalate the rapid adoption of these new books. He also said tremendous opportunities exist in aircraft and industrial maintenance as well as corporate training.

“If you’re on a ladder looking at a jet engine that needs repair, which would you rather use as a guide, a 3-inch binder or an iPad mini strapped to your arm that weighs a little more than a half-pound? With these books, a technician can watch videos and study interactive photographs and drawings of what the working part is supposed to look like and follow the sequential steps in how to fix it,” Claxton said.

Claxton said books for the iPad have moved beyond the promotional and theoretical stage. School districts around the country are buying the units in rapidly increasing numbers.

For instance, a Nov. 5, 2012 issue from Time magazine cited examples of the New York City Public School system ordering more than 2,000 iPads for $1.3 million, the Virginia Department of Education spending $150,000 for an iPad initiative in 11 schools, and Chicago public schools spending $450,000 for 23 district-funded iPad grants.

“When Apple made the iPad mini announcement in October the pundits said it was to combat the rise in the Kindle Fire because of its cost,” Claxton said. “The real story is that a school superintendent with $1 million to spend pre-iPad mini could buy 2,000 units. With the iPad mini being $179 cheaper, they can now buy 3,000 units for the same amount of money. An added bonus is that kids’ fingers work very well on the smaller units.”

Books for the iPad and iPad mini include 3D animations, videos, multi-touch interactive images, puzzles, in-chapter quizzes, study guide notecards and now, with the release of the iBooks 3 app—social media capabilities that mean a student can ask a peer, teacher, parent or even the author themselves for assistance if they come across a section in a book they don’t understand.

“We want parents, teachers, administrators and corporate managers to see how this new technology can make a dramatic difference in how their children learn for the rest of their lives,” Claxton said. “What Apple Isn’t Saying About Books For iPad is offered for free downloading off our site to help educate why these books are so different from anything else they’ve ever seen.”

The book released Thursday includes 10 videos, a spooky 3D animation of the Maya Rio Azul Mask, a multi-touch image that demonstrates the new social media functions in the iBooks 3 app, an interactive map that shows the developmental patterns of ancient Mesoamerican cultures, and even a digital sliding puzzle of the book’s cover.

“We are in the middle of something huge for education, training and the spread of knowledge around the world. This isn’t a gold rush; it’s a gold landslide and few seem to realize it is even happening,” Claxton said.

Claxton said his company is putting the final touches on a children’s book for the iPad entitled, There’s A Zombie In My Treehouse, by authors Ken Plume and John Robinson of Atlanta. The book, which previously has been featured in WIRED, has 16 different readers tell the story, including some famous movie personalities, like Peter Serafinowicz, best known for his voice as the Sith Lord Darth Maul in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace.

Over the next 10 days, ClaxtonCreative.com will feature a particular aspect of the book for the benefit of those who still do not own an iPad. Each day, a new topic will be presented, complete with a short video also featuring a characteristic of these new books available only on the iPad and iPad mini.

Claxton Creative, LLC

Claxton Creative is a Dallas-based full-service public relations firm focused on the development of interactive, multi-touch publications for mobile devices worldwide. The company was founded by former Dallas ISD communications director, Donald J. Claxton and is supported with the assistance of Fort Worth Author Ron Rose, Dallas Author Allen Manning, Birmingham, AL editor Larisa Lovelady, Ally Stephenson of Huntsville, AL, and others.

Apple, the Apple logo, iBooks, iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store and iBookstore are service marks of Apple Inc.

—30—

b

Enhanced by Zemanta
read more

Athens State University: Example of FB Business Pages Working QUICKLY

Apr 10, 2011 by

This morning we posted a request for information on the Athens State University Facebook page.  We’re back in Huntsville, Alabama working with our client here and looking for some assistance via interns who might be looking to actually try their teachings out on a live project.

A short post on the Athens State Facebook page yielded an email asking for more information to forward on to the right person on campus.  All in about an two hours.  And on a Sunday, no less.

This is how social media, and particularly, Facebook’s business pages, even for universities, is supposed to work.

Still trying to figure out how to reach the same people at the University of Alabama at Huntsville.  (By contrast, here is their FB page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/University-of-Alabama-at-Huntsville/115889055092230?ref=ts&sk=info)

Nonetheless, congrats to Athens State.

Enhanced by Zemanta
read more

Pin It on Pinterest