Don’t Use WD Unlocker on a Mac with Mountain Lion

Oct 15, 2013 by

Don’t Use WD Unlocker on a Mac with Mountain Lion

Error message trying to start Aperture with on a drive with WD Unlocker

Error message trying to start Aperture with on a drive with WD Unlocker

When I bought my 2 TB Western Digital external hard drive a few months back it came with a new feature that made a lot of sense–WD Unlocker, which allowed me to password protect the drive in case I ever left it somewhere or someone stole it.

Well, what I didn’t know is that when hard drives on a Mac go to sleep, they shut off the password protection on the external drive and until you go through the password process again, it does not work. And, I’ve been getting these -50 error messages from my Mac ever since. A call to Apple Care recommended resetting the Power Saving features of my Mac back to the factory settings, but I am here and then step away from the Mac all day long and the factory settings really aren’t acceptable.

Worse still, is that my 800 GB Aperture Library is on this one drive, too.  And once it goes to sleep, and you try restarting Aperture, chances are high you’re going to get an error message. (See above.)

I’m sorry, but this really isn’t acceptable, either on the part of WD or Apple.  To their credit, Apple tried to help me fix this. I’ve searched Google a couple times about WD Unlocker and there’s just not that much out there.

So here’s the solution I’m adopting. Right now, I’m two hours into what said was a four-hour transfer–even using a USB 3.0 connector and sending it to a G-Drive running thru Thunderbolt, it’s still taking five to six hours to transfer the 800 GBs.

When that process is complete, I’m going to reformat the external drive and start over.  This is taking far too much time to do, but in the long run, it’s going to save me a ton of time. Getting to the back of an iMac every time my machine goes to sleep has become a royal pain, not to mention an unnecessary one.

WD, you need to work out with Apple to resolve this.  The whole thing with Aperture has been more than I should have had to deal with and I count this as your fault.

There also doesn’t appear to be anyway to simply turn the PWD thing off. Your instructions for that are not easy to understand.

So if you’re out there and wondering should you install WD Unlocker on your external drive, my recommendation is don’t, unless you have tons of time to waste and like -50 error messages.

(The second image is what I get now when I try to delete a file off the drive.)  And this message is presenting even after I’ve gone thru and unlocked the hard drive once again.

 

-50 error message on a Mac because of WD Unlocker

-50 error message on a Mac because of WD Unlockerth

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The Essence of File Management In A Terabyte World

May 19, 2013 by

The Essence of File Management In A Terabyte World

In a few years, I’m sure people will look back on this 2013 post and laugh–I’m struggling with file maintenance on my Mac and running out of Gigabytes and now even Terabytes. Where do we go from here? Petabytes.

The ever complex problem of file management in a digital world. From kilobyte, to megabyte, to gigabyte, to terabyte and soon, the petabyte.

The ever complex problem of file management in a digital world. From kilobyte, to megabyte, to gigabyte, to terabyte and soon, the petabyte.

While this may seem like a fairly trivial First World issue, it’s a rapidly expanding problem that computer manufacturing companies don’t seem to be addressing fast enough. Yes, Apple’s iMacs now come with a 1 TB drive, but as I’ve found in the world of HD video editing, a terabyte doesn’t last very long.  And a gigabyte? Yeah, well there are 1,000 gigabytes in a terabyte…

For those of you who don’t understand what I’m talking about, there’s a progression in the size of hard drives. Back in the late 80s, when Macs were first getting going, I remember floppy disks that had 512 kilobytes on them. That was considered a lot.  Then we progressed to megabytes. As Moore’s law was proven more and more correct and the need for more and more storage came about came the gigabyte in the late 2000s. As we’ve escalated the need to store data up to 2013 with the proliferation of HD video, expanding iTunes libraries and storage of photos in things like iPhoto and Aperture libraries, demand for space continues to grow and at a rapid rate. The thing to have now is at least a terabyte of storage.

But most computers these days aren’t coming with hard drives that have anything more than a terabyte. This MacBook Pro, bought in March of 2012, had 750 GBs on it. I’m down to about 284 GBs left and that’s freaking me out because that means I’ve used almost 500 GBs and eventually, I’m going to run out. I’ve only had this machine for 15 months!

The solution then comes with external hard drives and the Cloud.  I’ve been a user of Dropbox for some time, but when I store something in Dropbox, it also lives in the hard drive of my Mac, so if I took the 60.6 percent of the 222 GBs I have over there off my Mac, I’m only going to get back about 100 GBs. My iTunes library now is about 300 GBs. My primary Aperture photo library is almost 700 GBs.

I have two external hard drives I use regularly on my Mac now. One stores the Aperture library, the other iTunes.  I have desktop hard drives that store video, do Time Machine back ups and then a smaller drive I use for archiving.

And while the day after I just bought that new 2 TB external drive to attach to this Mac, I have only about 3.5 TBs of available space right now before I need to buy another external unit.  As funny as it may sound, that makes me squirm because I know it’s not going to last long.  Combined, I have enough storage space for about 7.75 GBs. That means I’ve used about 60 percent of available space.

Yesterday, a fellow dad blogger recommended a new Cloud storage site called Bitcasa. For either $10 a month or $99 per year, they’re offering unlimited lifetime storage space. What I am not sure about yet is if I have things here on my laptop like I do with Dropbox, am I going to be taking up disc space in both places? Meaning, if I loaded 100 GBs of space to Bitcasa and I can see access to it on my Mac, am I going to be down another 100 GBs here on the Mac, too.  And that’s where my problem lies. If I could put all 4.5 GBs of stuff I have out on Bitcasa and it not try to replicate or drain space here on the Mac, that’d be swell.

Otherwise, it’ll be time to get something more than a 2 TB hard drive before too much longer.

Next, the Petabyte — or 1,000 Terabytes. Somehow, I don’t think it’s going to take very long to get there…..

 

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iBooks Author Issues–Verify your destination disk isn’t full

Nov 25, 2012 by

iBooks Author Issues For Uploading A Book for iPad–Verify Your Destination Disk Isn’t Full

It has been a struggle the past few hours to address several iBooks Author issues while trying to upload a new version of a book made in the pre-Oct. 23, 2012 versions of the software.

The problems began with two reports from customers who bought Dr. Mark Van Stone’s 2012: Science & Prophecy of the Ancient Maya on the iBookstore. They say they downloaded the book and it won’t open.  Having a copy from the 1.0-series of iBooks Author, knowing it is working fine on my iPad, and knowing how Apple works out the bugs in software before releasing an update, I was puzzled by this and begun to investigate.  As a result, a fresh copy has been uploaded to Apple, but it has been a multi-hour process and since it’s a weekend, iBooks Support is closed.

What I Had To Do

When I opened our book, which I’d not had the .iba file open since Oct. 8, 15 days before the release of version 2.0, it first alerted me that there was a photo on page 156 that was too big. It had worked from in version series 1.0-etc.  Nonetheless, it was now being flagged as a problem, and so I loaded the photo into Photoshop, resized it, saved it and then loaded it into the.iba file, while also extracting the older, bigger conflicting photo.

I also fixed two typos we’ve found and then began to save the book for exporting and reloading to the iBookstore via iTunes Producer. I then saved the file and exported it a couple of times as a .iBooks file.  No problem. I then began the process of “Publishing” the file to send it to Apple.  Here’s where the troubles began.

This Became A Major Drama

First of all, apparently via the iBooks Author autosave function on my Mac, (loaded on a hard drive that has some 300-plus Gig of memory left on it), began to display the following message:

Verify your destination disk isn't full and that you have permission to write to it

“Verify your destination disk isn’t full and that you have permission to write to it” while loading a book for iPad to Apple.

“Verify your destination disk isn’t full and that you have permission to write to it”  kept displaying. I took those exact terms and did a search and there is pretty much NOTHING in Google about this.  NOTHING.  Great. It was 11 p.m. at night on a Saturday and I was stressing to get this done and off to bed.

After a little more digging I learned that if you go to the “Title Bar” of an open file on a Mac, a little triangular box will appear and you can do a drop down.  That produced this box:

Title Bar Dropdown Menu in iBooks Author for Versions and Autosave

This is the Title Bar Dropdown Menu in iBooks Author for Versions and Autosave. After getting the dialogue box above, I then proceeded to “Browse All Versions…”

From there, I chose the “Browse All Versions …” link that then took me to this amazing looking screen. The problem was, none of the earlier versions on my machine were ones that I could open. I don’t know if they’d been purged or if there is still some other issue remaining.

 

Browse All Versions ... Screen on MacBook Pro Using iBooks Author

Browse All Versions … Screen on MacBook Pro Using iBooks Author

 

The next thing I tried, since I couldn’t pull up an earlier version, was the “Move To…” option, which allowed me to move the autosaving and to actually SAVE the .iba file again.

Move To ... Screen in iBooks Author

Move To … Screen in iBooks Author

Now that that hurdle had been overcome, I thought I was ready to load the book once again to the iBookstore. It’s been on sale on the iBookstore since Aug. 23. We’ve had a good run of sales.  It’s an established product.  But when I chose to “Publish” this newer version, Lord have mercy…. Over I went to iTunes Producer 2.8 and that’s another story to tell….

More about that in the next post.

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Why I cut 3,119 Non-Followers on Twitter and Feel the Better For It

Jan 6, 2011 by

As you may recall, there was a post here on DaddyClaxton.com 371 or so days ago was entitled: Why I cut 3,300 peeps from my @Twitter account and feel all the better for it.  This year, I only cut 3,119, but it was time for a cleansing of the tweeps who I was following who either weren’t kind enough or who were too important in their own minds to be following me back.  There was a smaller group, like of about 350 or so, whom I cut because they haven’t used Twitter like  since the days of smoke signals. 

It took me about three days again, but this year I had help.  I used a couple of UnFollow Twitter sites.  And using Firefox and a plug in that lets me check boxes on pages where the Twitter API no longer will allow programmers to build it into a page, I zapped roughly 1,500 peeps a day, by the categories mentioned above.  The site I used for the purging was ManageFilter and I have to say, it worked really, really easy.  Of course, I didn’t cut everyone it recommended, but it did clear a lot of fog.  Because really, who wants to get a bunch tweets from someone you can’t really carry on a conversation with?

I used ManageFilter most of all because it didn’t cost me anything.  I began with another site, Untweeps.com, and although they were kind enough to tell me of the Firefox plug-in Check-Fox, I couldn’t figure out how to use it.   It’s sort of tricky, but it goes like this.

On a Mac, you hit Control+A at the same time you’re right clicking on your mouse. (I think it’s the same for a PC, but if you have a PC, you’re probably more worried about if it’s going to work in 10 minutes than the number of Twitter followers who aren’t following you.) This works on pages where there are check boxes for miles and you don’t have the patience or the extra hour or so of time to click down through say, 1,500 boxes. Because I didn’t know that Untweeps.com, would only cut 500 non-followers at a time, I wasted the time to highlight the 1,500 I wanted to get rid of, only to click delete and for it to tell me it had a limit.  So, I wasted about an hour and a half time, total, and largely decided I was not happy.  I then downloaded the Check-Fox add on for Firefox, logged back into Untweeps.com to use it, and then it said my three FREE attempts were all used up and I could pay $1.37 or some crazy-assed amount to use it for three days.  I sent Untweeps.com‘s developer a Tweet saying how disappointed I was.  His response was to get the Check-Fox add on.  I decided for the time I’d already invested with them, there was no way I was going to pay $1.37.

Twitter 2011

Like last year, I want to commend Twitter for how it’s really worked to clean up the spammers and those tramps trying to sell sex sites.

But I also have to say that I’m not real crazy about their new layout.  It’s frustrated me, and maybe that’s more so because I’m now 45, but here’ what I did last night that I didn’t want to do.

I sent a DM to someone I didn’t want to send a DM to.  I clicked in the messages portion I guess at the top center of the new Twitter screen and sent them a message.  Well, I was so tired when I sent it, and frustrated that I was having to use new Twitter that I didn’t realize until this morning that I’d sent the DM.  

So, for those of you out there who might be struggling with the new Twitter to figure out how to send a DM to someone, you click the MESSAGE space at the top.  Now the screen it takes you to to me feels like it’s a Timeline screen, and that’s where I made my error.

So, person who got a DM from me last night asking why you’ve not been on Twitter the past few days, I didn’t mean to do that, and I’m glad you replied this morning to one of my normal tweets to you.  Like I promised when you began following me, I plan to continue to be judicial in how I send DMs to you, as the last thing I want to happen, is for you to unfollow me.

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